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FAQs

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Work Areas & Outlets (back to top)

Q: What is the difference between Classic Configurable Surface Mount Boxes & ELITE Configurable Surface Mount Boxes? 

A: View the charts below to observe the differences between the Classic and ELITE configurable Surface Mount Boxes.

Q: Where is position 1 located on a RJ-45 modular plug & jack?

A: Position 1 on a RJ-45 modular plugs is the first pin on the left with the clip pointed away from you. The wire that is inserted into position 1 depends on what standard the installer is using, it will be the striped green and white wire for T-568A and orange and white for T-568B. Position 1 on the RJ-45 modular jack is the first pin on the left with the CATEGORY logo the right side up.

Q: What are the features of the ICC USB Modular Connectors?

A: ICC "SUPERSPEED" USB 3.0 (Universal Serial Bus) couplers are ideal for connecting a wide range of peripherals such as video, audio, infrared, and computer equipment in commercial and residential applications. USB 3.0 is backwards compatible with v1.1 and v2.0. Data rate transmission is up to 5 Gbps but the operation distance is reduced from 16.4 feet (5 meters) to 10ft (3 meters). Compatible with ICC's faceplates, blank patch panels and decorex inserts. Always double check when using these USB couplers with junction boxes and surface mount boxes, restrictions may apply due to the USB connectors.

ICC PART NUMBERS
IC107UAAWH
IC107UABWH
IC107AUSWH

Q: Can ICC HDMI female to female modules support 4K?

A: Yes, all ICC HDMI modules can support 4K ultra high-definition quality. The module can support HDMI cable for a maximum distance of 33 feet (10 meters).

HDMI PART NUMBERS
IC107DH2WH
IC107DDHWH
IC107AHMWH
IC107HDMWH

Q: Can I terminate voice jacks using the included wiring cap?

A: ICC includes retention caps to protect the terminals and protect from dust but are not designed for terminating the wires. ICC recommends using the JackEasy tool or traditional 110 punch down tool for termination.

Q: What is the difference between the 50 and 75 Ohm BNC connectors?

A: ICC offers BNC video connectors, the 50 Ohm suitable for analog video and 75 Ohm for digital video.

Q: Does ICC supply mounting hardware with faceplates?

A: ICC faceplates come with two mounting screws for single gang faceplates four mounting screws for double and triple gang faceplates.

Q: What is the maximum distance for ICC HDMI connectors and Decorex Inserts (IC107HDMxx, IC107DH2xx, IC107DDHxx)?

A: Depends on the HDMI cable, the typical maximum distance for HDMI cable is 10 meters (33 feet).

Q: What does the S mean on the back of the P/N: IC107SAPxx? Which wire is used for the right and left audio channels?

A: Tip – Positive – Left Channel Ring – Negative – Right Channel Sleeve – Ground All three connections must be made to have stereo sound.

Q: Can ICC's CAT 5e modules IC1078E5xx and IC1078F5xx run up to 350MHz?

A: The modules are capable of running up to 350 MHz although there is no standard requiring the module to run at that level. Nor is there any performance requirement established at that frequency.

Q: Can ICC’s 8P8C modular plug be used in the CAT 5, CAT 5e, or CAT 6 applications?

A: The 8P8C modular plug is compatible with the CAT 5 or CAT 5e connectors found in mechanical structures. The performance depends on the lowest category of cable, patch cord, and jacks used. Cat 6 patch cords should be manufactured and not made in the field.

Q: Why does the IC1078E5xx Category 5e EZ Module show open when stranded cable is used?

A: The IC1078E5xx Category 5e EZ Module is rated at 22-24 AWG solid wire only. Solid core connectors are designed so that the blade in the pin connection is split into two tines, which firmly grasps the solid wire. Stranded wire connectors are designed so that the blade pierces the strand. If the wrong type of connector is used, the most likely result will be an intermittent connection.

Q: Does ICC manufacture a modular plug for solid wire?

A: ICC offers ICMP8P8C6E (CAT 6), ICMP8P8C6S (CAT 6 SHIELDED), ICMP8P8C5E (CAT5E), ICMP8P8SRD (8P8C) and ICMP6P6SRD (6P6C).

Q: What is the difference between the EZ and HD jacks?

A: ICC EZ jacks provide - Pair-to-Pair, Single Row Terminates in Seconds! • Fits all Classic and Elite faceplates • Fits all surface mount boxes • Fits blank patch panels patch panels (excepts HD style IC107BP241 & IC107BP482)) ICC HD jacks provide - When You Need to Fit More Jacks in a Tight Space. • Fits all Décorex style faceplates • Fits all furniture faceplates • Fits all blank patch panels, surface mount boxes • High-density split pair termination

Q: What is the difference between Shielded twisted pair and Screened twisted pair cable?

A: Shielded twisted pair cable (STP) is most often known as IBM Type I cable or STP-A. It is defined in ANSI/TIA/EIA-568-A as two individually twisted pairs separated by a shield with a nominal impedance of 150 Ohms. Screened twisted pair cable (ScTP) can be considered a very close relative of STP. It consists of 4 pairs of 22 or 24 AWG wire enclosed by an out foil. Impedance is 100 Ohms.

Q: What faceplates will work with the ICC low profile mounting box (PN: IC250MBSWH)?

A: The faceplates that are compatible with the low profile mounting box are wall plates and Decorex inserts with screw-down terminals only. The low profile mounting faceplates are designed for rear cable entry only so they will not be compatible with ICC raceway. Dual integrated faceplates with F-type connectors will not work with the low profile mounting box.

Q: Why is 50-micron gold plating Important on ICC RJ45 Modular Connectors & Modular Plugs?

A: The RJ45 Modular Connectors & Modular Plugs are the main connection between devices. There must be a type of metal to accomplish and maintain a stable conductivity. Gold is the perfect solution since it does not corrode and very durable. Others metals such as copper and nickel will degrade and lose connection over time when exposed to the outside elements like humidity and moisture. The amount of gold plating that can be placed on connectors is measured in microns. 50 microns is the thickest gold plating available, which is great for maintaining a fast and stable connection and can deliver up to four times as much throughout. FCC and IEC specifications call for a minimum amount of gold or nickel to be used in RJ45 plugs, but a recent study found that more than 50% of tested plugs did not meet this minimum. Because there is a large amount of inferior Ethernet cables on the market, it is important to look for those that specifically say that they have 50 microns of gold plating. FCC and IEC specifications also require connectors that are at least 99% pure gold and have no surface defects.
If cable manufacturers advertise their plugs and connectors have 50-micron gold plating then most likely they are using 99% pure gold.

Q: Why ICC doesn’t offer CAT 6 and CAT 5e FTP/shielded connectors?

A: IC1078S6A0 is ICC’s solution for FTP modular connector requirements.  Our CAT6a HD FTP shielded modular jack is designed to deliver advanced performance for 10G applications and it is backward compatible with CAT 6 and CAT 5e systems.  Most importantly it is competitively priced against our competitors’ CAT5e and CAT6 FTP jacks. 

It is compatible with TIA-568A/B wiring; it works with 22~24awg solid wires, and it is compatible with our 4-pair JackEasy tool. 

IC1078S6A0 can be installed with ICC 6A FTP blank patch panel IC107PPS6A and ICACSGK6AS grounding wire to complete an FTP system.

Q: What is a keystone module? Is ICC keystone modules interchangeable with each other? Is ICC keystone products interchangeable with other manufacturer’s keystone products?

A: Keystone modules have a rectangular face of .58” wide by .64” high and are held in place with flexible tabs. This allows them to be snapped into a mounting plate with the ports. All keystones, regardless of the type of jack they carry, are interchangeable and replaceable. This provides much flexibility in arranging and mounting many different types of electrical jacks in one plate or panel without requiring customized manufacturing (Please note: ICC EZ are not compatible with the High Density(HD) patch panels)


Q: What ICC products is the EZ style Modular Connectors compatible with?

A: EZ Style Modular Connectors Compatibility with Patch Panels
   • IC107PPU6A
   • IC107BE241
   • IC107BP8VB

   EZ Style Modular Connectors Compatibility with Faceplates
   EZ style modular will work will all of the ICC configurable faceplates except for the ICC Decorex inserts, EZ modular will only work with the following Decorex inserts.
   • IC107DI1xx
   • IC107DI2xx
   • IC107DI3xx
   • IC107DPIxx

Q: What is the difference between the EZ and HD Keystone Jacks?

A: ICC EZ Keystone Jacks provide -
    Pair-to-Pair, Single Row Terminates in Seconds!
   • Easy to terminate.
   • Fits all Classic and Elite faceplates
   • Fits single column Décorex style faceplates.
   • Fits all surface mount boxes
   • Not compatible with faceplate, inserts, blank panels that accept only HD modules.

   ICC HD Keystone Jacks provide -

   High Density, Low Profile to Fit More Jacks in a Tight Space.

   • Fits all Décorex style faceplates

   • Fits all furniture faceplates

   • Fits all blank patch panels, surface mount boxes

   • High-density split pair termination

Q: What types of mounting screws are used on ICC faceplates?

A: Majority of ICC faceplates (IC630, IC107F, IC107LF, IC107D, IC107S, IC106, and ICRDSV) come with Slotted Screws.  Only ICC stainless steel faceplates (IC107SF) come with Phillips Screws.

The deep slot on the Slotted Screw prevents the screwdriver from slipping and scraping the paint off during torque.   Slotted screws are more expensive to manufacture due to extra milling step required to deepen the slot and are commonly used on electrical faceplates.   Phillips Screws are designed for ease of use but tend to slip out easily damaging the head and paint.  Therefore, ICC only use it on stainless steel faceplate where there is no over paint on screws.


Q: How far can I remove the sheath on my CAT 5 or CAT 5e cable?

A: The TIA standard does not determine the length of un-sheathing; however, it is a good practice to remove the minimum you need for termination. Maintaining the twist is what is important (0.5” from termination point TIA/EIA-568.1 section 10.2.3) to keep the balance of the twisted pairs from being disturbed excessively to minimized near-end cross talk (NEXT)..

Q: Can we get gigabit performance from Category 5 UTP cables?

A: For any new installations, we recommend Category 5e or Category 6 cables and connectivity. On any existing Category 5 installations, you’ll need to re-test and pass PowerSum, ELFEXT, and Return Loss in order to run gigabit. D. Racks & Cable Management

Q: What is the purpose of the ICC’s Voice Modules (ICRESVPA3C, ICRESVPA2C & ICRESVPA1C) with RJ31X Jack?

A: The RJ31X Surface Mounting Jack is used with security systems or similar applications that feature a remote monitoring option. The RJ31X incorporates a shorting bar so that when the alarm reporting device is not plugged in, the phone line continuity is still maintained. This allows an alarm reporting device to be disconnected for testing or other options without disturbing phone service.

Q: What is the difference between T-568-A and T-568-B?

A: The pairs 2 (orange) and 3 (green) are interchanged. T-568-A is the original wiring configuration in TIA-568. T-568-B was put in the specification to accommodate the installation base at the time. T-568-B is still more widely used today. T-568-A is typically used in government and residential installations

Q: Does ICC manufacture a low profile mounting box that is shallower than the 1.89 inches deep NEMA box?

A: ICC provides a low profile single gang mounting box that is only 0.92 inch in depth (IC250MBSxx). Low profile surface mounting boxes are also available.

Q: If a faceplate hole has been cut too large in modular furniture, does ICC offer a solution?

A: ICC’s Universal Modular Furniture Faceplates (IC108UFPxx and IC108UF4xx) cover faceplate holes from a minimum of 0.875 inch x 2.375 inches to a maximum of 2.0 inches x 3.5 inches.

Patch Panels & Cross-Connect (back to top)

Q: How many times is it possible to terminate solid copper cable to a 110 Wiring Block or Patch Panel?

A: 200 times.

Q: Does ICC offer a Telco patch panel with RJ45 connectors?

A: Yes, ICMPP24T2C, ICMPP48T2C, ICMPP24T4C and ICMPP48T4C come with RJ-45 ports.

Q: What is the difference between 10-32 and 12-24 rack screws?

A: 12-24 Threads – ICACSS01BK - active
12-24 is now more common than 10-32 in pre-threaded racks. 12-24 fasteners are slightly larger than 10-32 and have courser threads. The term 12-24 comes from Unified and American Screw Threads for Bolts, Nuts, and Machine Screws standards published by ANSI B1.1-1974. The number “12” is simply a size designator with no numerical meaning. The number “24” refers to 24 threads per inch. You can identify a 12-24 screw by measuring the diameter with a ruler at slightly less than 7/32″ (slightly larger than 3/16″ or 0.210″).

10-32 Threads – ICACSS02BK - obsolete
10-32 threads are historically the original rack screw type. The term 10-32 comes from Unified and American Screw Threads for Bolts, Nuts, and Machine Screws standards published by ANSI B1.1-1974. The number “10” is simply a size designator with no numerical meaning. The number “32” refers to 32 threads per inch. You can identify a 10-32 screw by measuring the diameter with a ruler at exactly 3/16″ (0.190″).


ICACSS01BK

Q: What is a permanent link test?

A: Permanent Link Test: The tester main and remote have adapters with integrated cords of known performance. The device can therefore remove the loss of the cord from the total measurement, providing the performance of the link.
patch panel + cable + outlet (see diagram below):

Why test an incomplete system without the cords?
By testing the permanent link, information is provided about the permanently fixed part of the cabling. A “pass” for this test ensures that the system is always functioning.

Channel Test: The main and remote testing units have adapters with RJ45 ports. These adapters connect to the cabling with standard patch cords. The test is therefore covering the complete channel

cord + patch panel + cable + outlet + cord (see diagram below):

Q: Can ICC CAT6 solution support 10GBase-T?

A: Yes, ICC CAT6 modular jack, patch panel, and bulk cables can support 10GBase-T but with reduced operating distance.  But CAT6 cabling is not recommended for NEW installations targeted to support 10GBase-T application.  CAT6a is the choice for 10GBase-T copper but this does not mean the “installed” CAT6 cable will not support 10GBase-T, especially at shorter lengths.  To address the question of CAT6 cabling or 10GBase-T, TIA publishes TSB-155-a, Guide Lines for the Assessment and Mitigation of Installed Category 6 Cabling to Support 10GBase-T.

TSB-155-A states that 10GBase-T can operate over Channel lengths up to 37 meter of CAT6 cabling and 10GBase-T should operate over Channel lengths between 37 and 55 meters of cat 6 cabling depending on the alien crosstalk environment.  TSB-155-a further defined “installed” CAT6 cabling meeting the requirements of ANSI/TIA-568-C.2.  All ICC CAT6 products are guaranteed to meet or exceed TIA-568-C.2 requirements.

Below is a chart of Speed vs Bandwidth and distance for your reference.

Q: What is the application for RJ31X Jack with shorting bar?

A: The RJ31X Surface Mounting Jack with shorting bar is used with security systems or similar applications that feature a remote monitoring option.  The RJ31X incorporates a shorting bar so that when the alarm reporting device is not plugged in, the phone line continuity is still maintained.  This allows an alarm reporting device to be disconnected for testing or other options without disturbing phone service.  Below is the wiring diagram for your reference, the registered terminal equipment on this diagram is the security system.


RJ31X Jack with shorting bar is available on following ICC part numbers.
Surface Mount Jacks Integrated with Voice, KEYED: IC635DS4IV/WH, IC635DS8IV/WH
Residential Enclosures, Voice Modules: ICRESVPA3C, ICRESVPA2C and ICRESVPA1C

Q: What is the difference between CAT6 & CAT6e?

A: Category 6
The mainstream adoption of Gigabit Ethernet (1000BASE-T) required new industry-standard cables capable of transmitting at a higher frequency of 250 MHz. Category 6 cable uses thicker-gauge wire, increased shielding, and more pair twists per inch to reduce signal noise and interference. The tighter specifications guarantee that 100-meter runs of Category 6 are capable of 1000 Mbit/s transfer speeds. 10-Gigabit Ethernet speeds are achievable when reducing cable lengths to less than 50 meters.
Category 6e
CAT6e is an augmented specification designed to double transmission frequency to 600 MHz. By wrapping CAT6e in grounded foil shielding, full 10-Gigabit Ethernet speeds can be reached without sacrificing the max cable length of 100 meters. There is no standard for CAT6e that is recognized by TIA like there is for the CAT5e. The 600Mhz rated CAT6e is ICCs premium offering of CAT6 like most of the bulk cable manufacturers.

Q: Can ICC patch panel support POE?

A: Yes, ICC patch panels, 5e, 6 and 6a, can support IEEE 802.3AT POE+ applications.  Below is the property table of POE and POE+ for your reference.

PD - Powered Device
PSE - Power Sourcing Equipment
POE – Power Over Ethernet

Q: What are the smallest patch panels ICC manufactures?

A: ICC manufactures 12-port Vertical Patch Panels (ICMPP12V5E and ICMPP12V60), 12-port Vertical USOC Patch Panels (ICMPP012U6), and Vertical Blank Vertical Patch Panels (IC107BP12V & IC107BP8VB) with their mounting brackets.

Q: What is the difference between Shielded twisted pair and Screened twisted pair cable?

A: Shielded twisted pair cable (STP) is most often known as IBM Type I cable or STP-A. It is defined in ANSI/TIA/EIA-568-A as two individually twisted pairs separated by a shield with a nominal impedance of 150 Ohms. Screened twisted pair cable (ScTP) can be considered a very close relative of STP. It consists of 4 pairs of 22 or 24 AWG wire enclosed by an out foil. Impedance is 100 Ohms.

Q: Where can I get a 3 pair Category 3 Telco patch panel?

A: ICC manufactures voice grade USOC patch panels available in Telco or 110 styles.

Q: How is a 110 Block wired?

A: The color code on the wiring block must be followed exactly. The configuration is as follows: ? Pair 1 (White/Blue and Blue/White) ? Pair 2 (White/Orange and Orange/White) ? Pair 3 (White/Green and Green/White) ? Pair 4 (White/Brown and Brown/White)

Q: Do all ICC patch panels come with a bracket or rack?

A: The only patch panels that come with the mounting brackets are the Vertical Patch Panels (ICMPP12V5E & ICMPP12V60), Vertical USOC Patch Panels (ICMPP012U6), and Vertical Blank Patch Panels (IC107BP12V & IC107BP8VB). All other patch panels are designed to be installed in 19 inch racks or wall mountable equipment. (Racks are not included).

Q: Do you have a Telco patch panel with RJ45 connectors?

A: Yes, ICMPP24T2C, ICMPP48T2C, ICMPP24T4C and ICMPP48T4C come with RJ-45 ports.

Q: Does ICC manufacture a patch panel that can be wall mounted?

A: ICC’s 12-port Vertical Patch Panels (ICMPP12V5E and ICMPP12V60), 12-port Vertical USOC Patch Panels (ICMPP012U4 and ICMPP012U6), and Vertical Blank Patch Panels (IC107BP12V, IC107BP8VB and IC107PP8VB) come with the mounting brackets that can be fastened to a wall. ICC also offers wall mounted brackets that accept standard 19 inch rack mounted patch panels.

Q: Are the connectors on the ICC’s Telco Patch Panels male or female?

A: ICC Telco Patch Panels accommodate both male and female cable connectors.

Q: How many times is it possible to rewire (punch down wire) 110 Connecting Block on a 110 Wiring Block or Patch Panel?

A: 200 times.

Q: Does ICC manufacture a Telco Patch Panel?

A: ICC manufactures several Telco Patch Panels. These high-density patch panels are available in 4,6 & 8 conductors, 24 and 48 port configurations.

Q: Are all ICC’s 8P8C Modular Connectors TIA/EIA Categories rated and compliance?

A: Yes, ICC manufactures only Category 5e, 6, 6A 8P8C Modular Connectors.

Cords & Cable Assemblies (back to top)

Q: What is the UL 94 Standard for Safety of Flammability of the ICC plastic material?

A: All ICC Modular Connectors are classified as UL 94V-0 which the burning stops within 10 seconds on a vertical specimen, drips of particles are allowed as long as they are not inflamed. Most of ICC competitors Modular Connectors are classified as UL 94V-2 which is less flame-retardant, allowing the burning to stop within 30 seconds on a vertical specimen and drips od flaming particles are accepted. Some ICC Modular Plugs are classified as UL 94V-0 while some are UL 94V-2 (See Chart Below).

Q: What is REELEX and why is the REELEX logo on all ICC bulk cable cartons?

A: REELEX is a technological method of winding cable products on a specialized coiling machine. This specialized wind results for superior payout performance. It also helps dispenses cable smoother to prevent twists, kinks, snags and tangles. REELEX is the brand of choice for packaging thousands of product types by over 100 of the largest wire and cable manufactures.

• No Twist
The coiling process imparts self-cancelling twists in the product so that when the product is pulled from the package, it dispenses perfectly straight.

• No Overruns
Since the coil does not rotate, there is no spinning reel and no inertia.

• No Tangles
Coils unwind from the inside-out with no moving parts so the product dispenses straight, easy, and snag-free.

• Environmentally Friendly
The packaging uses the most readily recycled materials in the world.

• Carton Damage? No Problem
The coil does not depend on the package to work properly. If the package is minor damage, it will not affect the dispensary of the cable.

• Lightweight and Easy to Handle
REELEX can be carried with one hand making transport easy.

• Less Waste
REELEX cardboard boxes can easily be recycled, more efficiently than spools and reels.

Q: Can you provide me with a conduit fill capacity chart for ICC premise cable? 

A: This chart is based on the maximum number of cables permitted in conduit under the National Electric Code (NEC) and is calculated on the area of the cables with 40% of the conduit filled.  For conduit runs of 50 to 100ft, the installed number should be reduced by 15% or use the next size larger conduit.  Each 90° conduit bend may be estimated as equal to the friction of 30ft of straight level conduit. 

Q: What kind of cable do you use in your patch cord?

A: We use 24 AWG stranded UTP cable for CAT 5e and 23 AWG stranded UTP cable for CAT 6.

Q: Can I use telephone line cords to connect a LAN?

A: Using telephone line cords to connect a LAN is not recommended. Line cords are designed to work with low speed applications such as voice transmission.

Q: How far can I remove the sheath on my CAT 5 or CAT 5e cable?

A: The TIA standard does not determine the length of un-sheathing; however, it is a good practice to remove the minimum you need for termination. Maintaining the twist is what is important (0.5” from termination point TIA/EIA-568.1 section 10.2.3) to keep the balance of the twisted pairs from being disturbed excessively to minimized near-end cross talk (NEXT).

Q: Do you have to use the manufacturer’s patch cords to get Category 6 performance?

A: The Category 6 standard has specifications for patch cords and connectors that are intended to assure interoperable Category 6 performance. If manufacturers can demonstrate that each component meets the requirements in the standard, minimum Category 6 performance will be achieved. However, manufacturers may also tune their products to perform better than the minimum Category 6 requirements and in these cases using compatible patch cords and connectors may lead to performance above the minimum Category 6 requirements.

Q: Why are their booted and unbooted patch cords? What is the purpose of the boot?

A: The purpose of the boot is to protect the latch from snagging and breaking off such as in the case where you are pulling the cable. The unbooted / slimline cords are best suited for use in high density applications such as patch panels.

Q: Can you recommend a field tester for wiring set ups?

A: The most commonly used testers are Fluke, Ideal, Microtest, and Agilent.

Q: Will contractors be able to make their own patch cords?

A: Category 6 patch cords are precision products, just like the cables and the connectors. They are best manufactured in a controlled environment to ensure consistent, reliable performance. The patch cords also need to be tested for transmission performance to ensure that they will not degrade the performance. All this supports leaving patch cords as a factory assembled product than a field assembled product for better consistency and reliability.

Q: What is the difference in stranded and solid cable?

A: Stranded cable has several small gauge wires in each separate insulation sleeve. Solid has one large gauge wire in each sleeve. Stranded cable is more flexible, making it more suitable for shorter distances and tight bends such as patch cords. Solid cable has better electrical performance.

Q: What is affected by RoHS?

A: RoHS will affect anyone who manufactures in the European Union (EU) and sells electrical and electronic equipment under their own brand. It will also affect resellers in the European Union (EU) who sell products under their own brand or products produced by other suppliers.

Racks & Cable Management (back to top)

Q: Are ICC Metal Products UL Listed?

A: UL listing is for safety, specifically on temperature and fire.  All ICC plastic products have safety rating tested and registered with 3rd party companies like UL and ETL.  ICC Metal Products are not UL Listed because it is not necessary to test for temperature and fire rating on metal products.  Most of our competitors that offer UL listed metal products have received the UL listing years before that are grandfathered in.  Spec jobs may require UL listed metal products that we will have to walk away because ICC doesn’t go after spec jobs.

Q: What is a standard Rack Mount Space(RMS)?

A: ICC uses the industry standard measurement(EIA/ECA-310-e) for all ICC products. According to the industry standard a rack unit is measured by the height of a patch panel, server, network switch or other similar equipment mounted in a 19-inch rack or a 23-inch rack. A single Rack Mount Space(RMS) and the pitch is 1.75”.  The screw thread pitch can be either 12-24 or 10-32(ICC uses 12-24).                                   


Q: What is the coating on ICC metal products?

A: ICC metal products were available with liquid coating and powder coating depending on the manufacturing facilities set up.  All current and future production of metal products will be only available in powder coating to ensure a durable, long lasting finish.

Q: What kind of hardware does ICC use for cable management racks?

A: The EIA/ECA-310 industry standard are #12-24 X 5/8 & #10-32 X 5/8. The more common screw for pre-threaded racks are #12-24 X 5/8 which is what ICC uses for cable management systems and accessories. The pan head size is 0.42" with the full length of 0.77". ICC only offers #12-24 X 5/8 screws with cable management panels or in packs of 25(PN: ICACSS01BK). ICC does not offer any #12-24 X 5/8 screws with any cable management racks.


Q: What is the difference between 10-32 and 12-24 rack screws?

A: 12-24 Threads – ICACSS01BK - active
12-24 is now more common than 10-32 in pre-threaded racks. 12-24 fasteners are slightly larger than 10-32 and have courser threads. The term 12-24 comes from Unified and American Screw Threads for Bolts, Nuts, and Machine Screws standards published by ANSI B1.1-1974. The number “12” is simply a size designator with no numerical meaning. The number “24” refers to 24 threads per inch. You can identify a 12-24 screw by measuring the diameter with a ruler at slightly less than 7/32″ (slightly larger than 3/16″ or 0.210″).

10-32 Threads – ICACSS02BK - obsolete
10-32 threads are historically the original rack screw type. The term 10-32 comes from Unified and American Screw Threads for Bolts, Nuts, and Machine Screws standards published by ANSI B1.1-1974. The number “10” is simply a size designator with no numerical meaning. The number “32” refers to 32 threads per inch. You can identify a 10-32 screw by measuring the diameter with a ruler at exactly 3/16″ (0.190″).


ICACSS01BK

Q: Does ICC offer real Velcro?

A: Yes, ICC offers real Velcro for cable management systems. ICC offers VELCO Brand ONE-WRAP Rolls and Ties that have proved their value as easy, re-usable, safe, adjustable bundling solutions that are gentle on fragile wires, cords and even fresh produce at the grocery. Recognizing a need in fiber optic networks we’ve designed a new line of ONE-WRAP Ties specifically for fiber optic cabling.

Q: Is the ICC Ceiling Rod Kit(ICCMSLCMRK) zinc plated or galvanized?

A: The ICC Ceiling rods and nuts from the kit are zinc plated. Zinc plating is normally 0.2 mils thick while galvanizing can be up to 1.0 mils thick. With over 5 times the protection it makes galvanizing ideal for outdoor use. All true galvanizing is hot dip galvanizing. Parts to be galvanized are submerged in molten, liquid zinc; hence the name “hot dip”. After 20 years outdoors a galvanized product will not show signs of rust. The galvanized product will develop a white protective coating (zinc oxide) that adds to its protective properties. Zinc plating has found wide acceptance as a surface finish for consumer, industrial, and commercial products. The relatively low cost, protective nature and attractive appearance of zinc plating make it a popular coating for nuts, bolts, washers, metal stampings, automotive components and fabricated parts for industrial applications.

Q: What is the difference between ICC’s Distribution Rack and ICC’s Cable Management Rack?

A: ICC’s Distribution Rack is an EIA standard 19” rack, designed for the ultimate in configuration flexibility. The 6061-T6 high-strength aluminum alloy makes ICC racks lightweight yet durable, excellent grounding characteristics.

Q: What is RMS?

A: RMS is rack mount space. 1 RMS = 1.75 inches

Q: Can shelves be mounted on the ICC Wall Mount Vertical Hinged Bracket?

A: The ICCMSVHB06 and the ICCMSVHB08 Wall Mount Vertical Hinged Brackets can both accept the 10 inch single standard or vented shelf. The ICCMSVHB18 Wall Mount Vertical Hinged Bracket can accept either 10 inch or 15 inch single standard or vented shelf. Caution: Be certain to remove all un-secured equipment from the shelf before the vertical hinged bracket is unhinged.

Q: Do ICC racks come with a grounding bus bar or kit?

A: No. Grounding kits are sold separately ICACSGKS00, and grounding bus bars are needed but not sold by ICC.

Q: How do I determine which hinged wall mount bracket would best suit my needs?

A: ICC’s Wall Mount Hinged Brackets and Wall Mount Vertical Hinged Brackets are rated according to the number of panels they hold. These panels may consist of patch panels, cable management components, or networking equipments. All brackets have an RMS (Rack Mount Space) number that corresponds to the total number of panels each bracket will hold. One RMS is equal to 1.75 inches in height. If the RMS number is unavailable, measure the panel height, then divide by 1.75. The resulting number will be the RMS number for that panel height. ICC’s Wall Mount Hinged Brackets are configured at 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, and 8 RMS, or in heights ranging from 1.75 inches to 14 inches. The Wall Mount Vertical Hinged Brackets are configured at 6 and 8 RMS, or in heights of 10.5 inches and 14 inches.

Q: What steps should be taken to level a Distribution Rack or Cable Management Rack?

A: There are three simple checks you should make. First, make certain the floor is leveled. Second, check to see if all floor mounting bolts have been tightened properly. Third, carefully inspect the rack to see if it may be out of alignment due to damage in shipping.

Q: Do you have ladder rack for my ICC rack?

A: Yes, ICC supports Ladder Rack System; they are the 10’ Ladder Rack Runway ICCMSLST10, 5’ Ladder Rack Runway ICCMSLST05, 90° Flat Turn Ladder Rack Runway ICCMSLFT90, 90°Inside Corner Ladder Rack Runway ICCMSLIR90, and 90° Outside Corner Ladder Rack Runway ICCMSLOR90.Ladder rack should be used to support the rack, perpendicular from the wall to the rack.

Q: Does ICC offer any 23 inch racks or rack mounted products?

A Yes. We have conversion brackets ICCMSCBARM & ICCMSCBBRM

Q: How does ICCs InstaRAQ :ICCMSWMUR5 mounted on the wall?

A Its mounted on the wall vertically which accommodates all standard 19 inch rack mount products regardless of their depth.

Q: What is affected by RoHS?

A: RoHS will affect anyone who manufactures in the European Union (EU) and sells electrical and electronic equipment under their own brand. It will also affect resellers in the European Union (EU) who sell products under their own brand or products produced by other suppliers.

Q: What standard ICC’s 12 & 26 RMS (ICCMSWMC12 & ICCMSWMC26) wall mount cabinets compliant with?

A: ICC’s 12 & 26 RMS (ICCMSWMC12 & ICCMSWMC26) are compliant to the EIA/ECA-310-E (revision of EIA-310-D) standard.

Q: How do I mount ICCMSWMC12 & ICCMSWMC26 wall cabinets on the wall?

A: You will need to use a level to mark 16” on center locations and use (4) ¼-10 x 2 lag screws to secure into the wood studs. We also recommend using ¾” plywood to support the back of the cabinet against the wall. For concrete or masonry surface, the installer must provide appropriate hardware. Mounting hardware not included.

Q: How are cables managed in the cabinet for ICCMSWMC12 & ICCMSWMC26?

A: For Vertical Cable Management, we recommend using ICC’s vertical plastic rings (ICCMSCMPR5, ICCMSCMPR7) or metal rings (ICCMSCMPT1, ICCMSCMPT2) and VELCRO cable ties (ICACSVxxxx). For Horizontal Cable Management, any of ICC’s 1 RMS or 2 RMS horizontal cable management panels (ICCMSCMAxx) can be used for proper support.

Q: How to prevent vertical finger duct covers from sliding down?

A: Wrap and twist the elastic band around three fingers of the vertical panel. Repeat this step on all four corners of finger duct: top left, top right, bottom left, and bottom right then slide on the cover. Contact our Tech Support team at tech@icc.com to request elastic bands.

Fiber Optic System (back to top)

Q. What is the difference between MTP & MPO?

A: MPO stands for “Multiple-Fiber Push-On/Pull-Off”. It is a connector standard that meets TIA requirements. MTP stands for “Multifiber Termination Push-On” and is a specific Brand of a MPO connector developed by USCONEC. The features on MTP connector is to maintain flexibility and improve production yields at assembly house.  These features have very minimum benefit to the installer.

Q. What is the minimum bend radius & maximum pulling tension for fiber optic cables?

A: See table below

Cable Type and Installation Details

Maximum Tensile Load During Installation

Minimum Bend Radii While Subject to Maximum Tensile Load (During Installation)

No Tensile Load (After Installation)

Inside Plant Cable with 2 or 4 Fibers Installed in Cabling Subsystem 1

220 N

2 inches

1 inch

Inside Plant Cable with more than 4 Fiber

Per Manufacturer

20 times of Outside Diameter (O.D.)

10 times of Outside Diameter    (O.D.)

Indoor/Outdoor Cable with up to 12 Fibers

1335 N

Indoor/Outdoor Cable with more than 12 Fibers

2670 N

Q. What are the polarities of duplex fiber jumpers?

A: Type A/B LC Duplex and Type B Female-Female MPO Patch Cables Are Common
Two types of duplex fiber patch cords are defined in the TIA standard: A-to-A (cross-over) type and A-to-B (straight-through) type.

Easy to Understand Duplex
In duplex fiber applications, such as 10 Gig, data transmission is bidirectional over two fibers where each fiber connects the transmitter on one end and to the receiver on the other end. The role of polarity is to make sure that this connection is maintained.

The graph below shows the Tx (B) should always connect to the Rx (A), regardless of how many patch panel adapters or cable segments are in the channel. If polarity is not maintained, such as connecting a transmitter to a transmitter (B to B), data will simply not flow.

To help the industry select and install the right components to maintain proper polarity, TIA-568-C standards recommends the A-B polarity scenario for duplex patch cords. The A-B duplex patch cord is a straight-through connection that maintains the A-B polarity in a duplex channel. It's also important to note that every fiber connector has a key that prevents the fiber from rotating when the connectors are being mated and maintains the correct Tx and Rx position.

Q: What are the operating distances for fiber optic networks?

A: See table below

Designation

Core/Cladding

Type

 Fast Ethernet 

1Gigabit Ethernet 

10 Gigabit Ethernet 

Diameter (µm)

100BASEFX

1000BASE-SX

10GBASE

OM1

62.5/125

Multimode

  2000 M

275 Meters

33 Meters

OM2

50/125

Multimode

 550 Meters

82 Meters

OM3 (Laser Optimized) 

50/125

Multimode

300 Meters

OM4 (Laser Optimized)

50/125

Multimode

400 Meters

Single-mode

9/125

Single-mode

5 km at 1310 nm

10 km at 1310 nm

Q. Why the ICC MPO adapter panel doesn’t work for my MPO network?

A: A common reason is the installer is using 2 female MPO connectors to extend a MPO network. All Fiber cables transmit pulses of light instead of electrical signals, so the terminations must be precise. Fiber optic connectors must align microscopic glass fibers perfectly in order to allow for communication. In general, fiber cables are equipped with male connectors and the couplers have sleeves to guide the ferrules to make a connection. For MPO the connector is available without guide pins (female) or with guide pins (male) to align the fibers since the couplers do not have sleeves to guide them.  MPO adapter is just a shell to hold two connectors together.

Q. What is LOMMF?

A: Newer deployments often use 50/125 µm Laser-Optimized Multi-Mode Fiber (LOMMF/OM3).  Fibers that meet this designation provide sufficient bandwidth to support 10G ethernet up to 300 meters.  Optical fiber manufacturers have greatly refined their manufacturing process since that standard was issued and cables can be made that support 10G up to 400 meters.  Laser-Optimized Multi-Mode Fiber (LOMMF) is designed for use with 850 nm VCSELs (Vertical-Cavity Surface Emitting Laser).  The migration to LOMMF/OM3 has occurred as users upgrade to higher speed networks.  LEDs have a maximum modulation rate of 622 Mbit/s because they cannot be turned on/off fast enough to support higher bandwidth applications.  VCSELs are capable of modulation over 10Gs and are used in many high-speed networks.  ICC currently does not offer OM4.

Category

Diameter

Jacket Colors

Optical Source

Bandwidth

10G

OM1

62.5/125 µm

Orange

LED

200MHz*km

33m

OM2

50/125 µm

Orange

LED

500MHz*km

82m

OM3

50/125 µm

Aqua

VCSEL

2000MHz*km

300m

OM4

50/125 µm

Aqua

VCSEL

4700MHz*km

400m

Q: What are the different types of fiber cables ICC offers for fiber assemblies?

A: ICC offers both multimode, single-mode fiber assemblies. Multimode is available in 62.5/125/OM1, 50/125/OM2 and 50/125/OM3 . The most popular multimode cable in the industry is 50/125/OM3 with aqua jacket. Single-mode is 9 microns and it is with yellow jacket. ICC fiber jumpers are OFNR, Riser rated except MPO.  MPO has 12 fibers and available in multimode and single-mode. ICC offers MPO assemblies with OFNP, plenum jacket because installers use this cable as a horizontal cable.

Q: What type of fiber optic connectors does ICC offer?

A: ICC offers 4 different types of connectors for fiber optic assemblies. The more popular type is the LC (Lucent Connector). It is a snap coupling type and used often for high density connections. MPO (Multiple-Fiber Push-On/Push-Off) also has a snap coupling and is used to connect 12 fibers. The SC (Subscriber Connector) has a snap (push-pull coupling; duplex) which is used for Datacom and telecom. The ST (straight tip) connector has a bayonet connector used for Datacom.

Q: How many Splice Trays (PN: ICFOSKFM12) can be used with the 4RMS Fiber Optic Rack Mount Enclosure (PN: ICFORET4RM)?

A: The 4RMS Fiber Optic Enclosure has threaded rods allowing it to carry up to 6 Splice Trays. If installers do decide to install 6 Splice Trays they will need to remove the covers from all the trays except the last tray on top (1st photo). With each Splice Tray holding up to 12 splices each tray, it allows the installer to add up to 72 splices.

Q: Does ICC offer LGX compatible products?

A: Yes, ICC offers LGX compatible fiber enclosures, adapter panels and MPO fiber cassettes. LGX (light guide cross connect) is a registered trade mark of Lucent Technologies. LGX is a universal mating platform widely accepted in our industry for fiber connectivity.

Q: What is the capacity (number of fibers) of ICC’s Fiber Optic Enclosures?

A: The capacity of ICC’s Fiber Optic Enclosures is governed by two factors. It depends on the type adapter panel used in the enclosure and the maximum number of connectors for SC or ST. The are a number of different adapter panel options for each enclosure. Item Number Number of Max. SC Max. ST Adapter Panels ICFOR102xx 2 Panels 24 16 ICFOR204xx 4 Panels 48 32 ICFOR306xx 6 Panels 72 48 ICFOR412xx 12 Panels 144 96 ICFOD202xx 2 Panels 24 16 ICFOD204xx 4 Panels 48 32

Q: What type of cable is used in the horizontal cabling system?

A: Three types of cables are recommended for use in the horizontal cabling system: Four-pair 100 Ohm unshielded twisted-pair (UTP) or screened twisted pair (ScTP) cables.Two or more optical fiber multimode cable, either 62.5/125 µm or 50/125 µm. One single mode cable.

Q: If you have a 50 µm fiber backbone, can you use 62.5 µm fiber jumpers on each end? Or vise versa?

A: From 50 µm fiber backbone to 62.5 µm fiber jumpers, it’s OK on the receiver end, but on the transmitter end, the larger core of 62.5 µm into smaller 50 µm fiber will have losses of 2~4 dB. From 62.5 fiber backbone to 50 µm fiber jumpers, the excess loss is at the receiver end, not at the transmitter end.

Q: Why and when to consider using Fiber?

A :If you have a run longer than 295 ft. (from 62.5 to Single Mode, Fiber allows transmissions from thousands of meters to several kilometers) (EMI) Electron Magnetic Interference is an issue. (Since Fiber uses light signal it is not susceptible to electrical signal interference) Security is a major concern. (Since Fiber uses a light signal it is impossible to tap into the signal unlike copper lines) Other things to consider: Cost – Tools, Connectors, Training, Testers, and material. Difficulty – May require special training and practice to learn termination. ICC offers pre-terminated fiber solutions for installers from dual fiber jumpers

Q: How do you classify fiber optic cable?

A: By NEC & UL – flame retardancy By cable types (tight buffer/distribution/breakout/loose tube) By fiber types (multimode/singlemode/hybrid) Whether it has fiber and wire (composite cable)

Q: What is an MT?

A MT stands for mechanical transfer. It is a multi-fiber ferrule in which fiber alignment is critical for high performance. The key elements for fiber alignment are: 1) high precision molding. 2) high precision guide pins.

Q: What is an MPO?

A MPO stands for Multi-fiber Push On connector designed by NTT for the MT ferrule. The MPO connector family is defined by two different documents (or standards). Internationally, the MPO is defined by IEC-61754-7 and in the USA by TIA-604-5 (also called FOCIS 5).

Q: What is an MTP?

A The MTP is an improved MPO connector design trademarked by US Conec Ltd. The MTP is fully compliant with all MPO standards (FOCIS 5 and IEC-61754-7) and is therefore fully intermateable to any other MPO connector.

Q: What is unique about the MTP connector?

A -The connector housing is removable: - Allows easy transition from male to female (gender change) Allows re-polish & re-work

Q: What do PC and APC mean, with reference to Fiber Optic Connectors?

A: PC stands for Polished Connector. The end of the fiber is polished with a special polishing film to a crystal-clear finish. APC stands for Angles Polished Connector. The end of the fiber is polished with a special polishing film at an angle of approximately 8° for a superior quality finish. With this type of finish, reflected light will be absorbed in the cladding, reducing the back reflections.

Q: What is a hybrid cable?

A: A hybrid cable contains more than one fiber type in the same cable. For example, a private network application might call for both singlemode and multimode fibers. Placing both fiber types in the same cable would result in installation savings since there would be no need to install two separate cables. They can also include copper cables for Telco and /or data.

Q: Will a singlemode connector work on multimode cable?

A: Singlemode connector can be used on multimode cable but not the reverse. Singlemode connectors are made to tighter tolerance as is singlemode fiber. Multimode connectors have bigger holes for the fiber and will have high loss (>1dB) with singlemode. Also, multimode connectors may not be PC (physical contact) polish, which is terrible for return loss.

Q: Can I splice 62.5/125 µm fiber to 50/125 µm fiber? If so, what type of nominal loss would I be looking at?

A: If you splice it, you’ll get directional losses. Transmitting from 50 µm to 62.5 µm fiber, you’ll get virtually no losses but from 62.5 µm to 50 µm, you’ll get a minimum of 1.6~1.9 dB loss due to the size and NA (numerical aperture) mismatch.

Q: What are some of the uses of fiber optic cabling in the business world?

A: The biggest use is telephony, followed by CATV, then LAN backbones, connecting hubs. Next is connecting remote video cameras for security systems. The building management and security systems are switching to fiber in many buildings due to distance and EMI requirements. Fiber is not often used to the desk because it is perceived to be too expensive, but it allows a system without wiring closets, making the cost less in most instances.

Q: Is there a standard jacket color for fiber optic cables?

A: For premise cables, the jacket color is dependent upon the fiber type in the cable. For cables containing singlemode fibers, the jacket color is yellow. For cables containing multimode fibers, the jacket color is orange. For outside plant cables, the standard color is black; however, other customer preference can be accommodated as well.

Q: What is the difference between the ceramic and metal sleeve fiber adapters?

A: The metal sleeve works for multimode only where as the ceramic adapter works for single and multimode has better alignment performance.

Q: How does an optical fiber transmit light?

A: The light in fiber optic cable travels through the core (hallway) by constantly bouncing from the cladding (mirror-lined walls), a principle called total internal reflection. Because the cladding does not absorb any light from the core, the light wave can travel great distances. However, some off the light signal degrades within the fiber, mostly due to impurities in the glass. The extent that the signal degrades depends on the purity of the glass and the wavelength of the transmitted light.

Q: What is the difference between Singlemode and Multimode fiber optic cable?

A: Singlemode: Core size is 8.3 µm, for 1550 nm – 1300 nm wavelength range, for long distance transmission, and allows only one pathway (mode) of light. Multimode: Common core sizes are 50 µm and 62.5 µm, for 1300 nm – 850 nm wavelength range, for short distance transmission, and allow more than one pathway (mode) of light. Please Note: Although the core sizes are different, it is impossible to distinguish between the two with the naked eye.

Q: How far can I connect by using multimode or singlemode fiber optic cable?

A: Multimode fiber optic cable connects up to 2,000 meters when the network is operated in full duplex mode. It can connect up to only 200 meters in half duplex mode. Singlemode fiber optic cable can transmit from 15,000 to 60,000 meters, depending on hardware and configuration.

Q: What is the difference between Horizontal and Backbone Cabling?

A: Horizontal cabling extends directly from the horizontal cross connect in the telecommunications room to the workstations, with no splices, bridges, taps, or other connections. Backbone cabling connects the telecommunications room with outside services, or connects telecommunications rooms together within, or between buildings.

Q: What is the definition of fiber optics and what are its advantages over copper wire?

A: Fiber optics refers to the concept of transmitting information, in the form of light, through cable fibers composed of highly purified glass or plastic, clad in a reflective coating. This allows the light beam to travel the length of the cable by bouncing off the reflective sides of the fiber. The advantages of a fiber optic system are: Information carrying capacity is greatly increased, while overall size and weight of the cable is greatly reduced. Information can be transmitted at a much higher speed over long distances. Security is increased because information is transmitted in the form of light through a non-conductive media (glass), whereas, electricity traveling through wires can be tapped by an outside agent, or accidentally pick up transmissions from other sources of electro-magnetic radiation.

Q: How do I install the Fiber Optic Splice Trays?

A: Installation of the Fiber Optic Splice Trays (ICFOSTFM12 & ICFOSTFM24) is simple: Splice trays can accommodate 12 and 24 splices respectively. Select left or right angle splice holder as applicable. There are holders to accommodate Bare Fusion, Fusion with Sleeves, and Ribbon Fusion. Attach the holder to the base of the tray; ensure that access and minimum bend requirements are not compromised. Trim and clean fiber cable as mandated by policy. Secure buffer tubes using snaps or tie down wraps. It is common practice for the buffer tube stop within ¼” of attachment point. Make and secure splices to holders, ensure that fibers are not being crimped or pinched and that cover will not pinch fibers. Snap cover back onto base. Utilize Velcro® cable ties to secure tray onto mounting surface on fiber tray, if applicable.

Q: What is affected by RoHS?

A RoHS will affect anyone who manufactures in the European Union (EU) and sells electrical and electronic equipment under their own brand. It will also affect resellers in the European Union (EU) who sell products under their own brand or products produced by other suppliers.

Premise Cables (back to top)

Q: What do the jacket markings mean on ICC bulk cables?

A: All ICC bulk cable have the markings on the table below (except PN)

• CMR/CMP
CMR – Riser Rated Cable
CMP – Plenum Rated Cable
• TIA Standard MHz – The industries standard of Megahertz rating
• MHz – ICCs cable Megahertz rating
• UTP/FTP
UTP – Unshielded Twisted Pair
FTP – Foiled Twisted Pair (Shielded)
• Temperature Rated – The Jackets temperature rating
• Pairs – How many twisted pairs the cable obtain
• Wire Size – The size of each cable in American Wire Gauge
• Performance Verified – ETL & UL verify the performance of all ICC bulk cable
• Safety Verified – UL verifies the safety rating of all ICC bulk cable


Q: What is the difference between the cartons in REELEX I & REELEX II?

A: The REELEX I (1st generation) is more compact compared to REELEX II making the first generation more space efficient. Also, the coiled cable is inserted through the side of the box (1st photo). The REELEX II comes in a bulky box and larger compared to the REELEX I. The bulky box helps prevent damage to the coil which may cause tangles which can be due to transport of the cable. The REELEX II is inserted through the front where the Payout hole is located (2nd & 3rd photo).

Q: Who verifies the performance and safety of ICC bulk cables?

A: For fire safety, UL verifies and confirm ICC bulk cables meet both CMR and CMP fire safety requirements.
For performance, ETL verifies and confirms ICC CMR bulk cables meet the TIA performance requirements.   UL verifies and confirms ICC CMP cables meet the TIA performance requirements.

Q: Why does the cable get tangled in REELEX cartons?

A: The most common way the cable gets tangled is during transport. More likely when an installer uses some on a jobsite then relocates to another site, when there is more free room in the carton it allows the cable to move inside thus ruining the coil. Another reason why the cable may get tangled is when the installer pulls too much cable and feeds it back into the carton which will also ruin the coil.

Q: What is the difference between REELEX I & REELEX II payout tube?

A: The REELEX I payout tube is less than 1” wide in diameter which causes tension when dispensing stiff and inflexible cable, allowing a greater chance for the cable to get tangled. With the REELEX II payout being 3.5” in diameter creating less tension to the coil reducing the chance of tangles. The REELEX II also improved the packaging to be more reinforced.

Q: What is the maximum length for horizontal cabling? What is the maximum length of patch cord in the horizontal cabling?

A: The maximum horizontal distance shall be 90m (295ft). The horizontal distance is the cable length from the mechanical termination of the media at the horizontal cross-connect in the telecommunications room to the telecommunications outlet/connector in the work area. The length of the cross-connect jumpers and patch cords in the cross-connect facilities, including horizontal cross-connects, jumpers, and patch cords that connect horizontal cabling with equipment or backbone cabling, should not exceed 5m (16ft) in length. For each horizontal channel, the total length allowed for cords in the work area plus patch cord or jumpers plus equipment cables or cords in the telecommunications room shall not exceed 10m (33ft), unless a multi-user telecommunications assembly is used. Note: in establishing the maximum distance for each horizontal channel, an allowance was made for 5 additional meters (16ft) from the telecommunications outlet/connector to the workstation.

Q: Are there any plans for Category 7 cable?

A: At the present time there are no plans to pursue CAT 7 cable production.

Q: Why does ICC use a reel for the CAT 6A UTP Cable?

A Due to the increased size and weight of the CAT 6A cable we decided to utilize a reel design which allows for faster dispensing, reduces likelihood of kinking, and can be mounted on an installers own dispensing apparatus for even faster or multiple cable pulls.

Q: What is the purpose of the rip cord?

A The rip cord is a feature that is available for those stripping the jacket from the cable without tools. ICC recommends using either of the items: ICACSTSUCD, ICACSTSUS1, or ICACSCTRS instead to remove the jacket. Using these tools will reduce the amount of cable wasted when stripping the jacket. The rip cord feature is conveniently available with our CAT 5e UTP cable.

Q: What is the difference between CM , CMR , and CMP ratings on the UTP cable?

A These are different fire ratings that may be required by local authorities in different areas. In most cases CM is general purpose (typically used on same level cable installs), CMR (typically required for cable runs between floor levels though increasing required for use on floor level runs i.e between workstations), and CMP (typically required for cabling runs above ceilings and below floors) areas shared by air ducts. Each fire rating indicates the level of toxic fumes emiited when that cable is burned and self extinguishing features.

Q: Why should I test the cables immediately after pull-in?

A: This simplifies subsequent troubleshooting. By testing the system at this point, should a problem arise after the equipment is installed, the cabling system can be ruled out as a probable cause.

Q: Can I run CAT-5e Ethernet cable outside?

A :CAT-5e cable is not rated for outdoor use, however it can generally be used without a problem. If possible, run the cable through some kind of conduit to prevent moisture or an attractive site for lightning to strike. You should be able to find gray PVC conduit suitable for cable at any hardware store. Remember, 100 Meters is your max distance, without some kind of hub, bridge or amplification.

Q: What are the recommended minimum bend radius when installing indoor copper premise cabling?

A: The recommended minimum bend radius for unshielded horizontal cables (6-pair or smaller) is 4 times the cable diameter. The recommended minimum bend radii for unshielded backbone cables (greater than 6-pair) and coax is 10 times the cable diameter. The recommended minimum bend radii for shielded backbone cables is 12 times the cable diameter.

Q: Can we get gigabit performance from Category 5 UTP cables?

A: For any new installations, we recommend Category 5e or Category 6 cables and connectivity. On any existing Category 5 installations, you’ll need to re-test and pass PowerSum, ELFEXT, and Return Loss in order to run gigabit. D. Racks & Cable Management

Q: What is the difference between a “Channel” and a “Link”?

A: These terms describe two Category certification tests. These tests differ in how much of a horizontal cabling run is included for testing. The basic difference is that a link includes only the permanent part of the cable run, while a channel includes patching and/or equipment cords as well.

Q: What does Riser rated (CMR)cable mean?

A: Riser rated cable is required for jobs where cable is going to be run vertically up multistory buildings in floor to floor wiring riser.

Q: What is the different between CMP and CMR rated cable?

A :Building codes require fi re rated cabling to provide protection for occupants in the event of a fi re. Fire rated cabling requirements strive to reduce the toxicity of fumes emitted by cabling when burned. • Riser-rated cable (CMR) is typically for general use in vertical spaces • Plenum rated cable (CMP) is typically used in air circulation spaces • Always check with your local, state, and federal laws for fi re code compliance

Q: What type of cable is used in the horizontal cabling system?

A: Three types of cables are recommended for use in the horizontal cabling system: Four-pair 100 Ohm unshielded twisted-pair (UTP) or screened twisted pair (ScTP) cables.Two or more optical fiber multimode cable, either 62.5/125 µm or 50/125 µm. One single mode cable.

Q: What is Horizontal Cabling?

A: The horizontal cabling is the portion of the telecommunications cabling system that extends from telecommunications outlet/connectors and the horizontal cross-connect in the telecommunications room to the workstation. Horizontal cabling includes outlet/connectors in the work area, mechanical terminations, and patch cords or jumpers located in the telecommunications room, and may include multi-user telecommunications outlet assemblies.

Q: What is Bend Radius for Cat 5e, Cat 6 and Cat 6a cables?

A: A: Per TIA-568 the general rule of thumb as it stands currently is a Bend Radius of about 4 times the diameter of the cable itself for Cat 5e & 6 cables. Refer to manufacturers specifications for the Cable.

Q: What is the difference between Horizontal and Backbone Cabling?

A: Horizontal cabling extends directly from the horizontal cross connect in the telecommunications room to the workstations, with no splices, bridges, taps, or other connections. Backbone cabling connects the telecommunications room with outside services, or connects telecommunications rooms together within, or between buildings.

Q: What is UTP cable?

A: UTP stands for Unshielded Twisted Pair. It is a cable type with one or more pairs of twisted insulated copper conductors contained in a single sheath. UTP cables are the most common type of cabling used in desktop communication applications.

Q: What is the difference between T-568-A and T-568-B?

A: The pairs 2 (orange) and 3 (green) are interchanged. T-568-A is the original wiring configuration in TIA-568. T-568-B was put in the specification to accommodate the installation base at the time. T-568-B is still more widely used today. T-568-A is typically used in government and residential installations.

Q: What does Plenum (CMP) rated cable mean?

A: Plenum rated cable is required for jobs where cable is going to be run in return air space. In most buildings this area is above drop ceilings or under raised floors. The materials required to pass plenum standards are much more expensive than non-plenum-rated designs.

Q: Can you recommend a field tester for wiring set ups?

A: The most commonly used testers are Fluke, Ideal, Microtest, and Agilent.

Q: What are the differences between Category 5 and Category 5e ratings?

A: Both Category 5 and Category 5e consist of unshielded twisted pair with 100 Ohm impedance and electrical characteristics supporting transmissions up to 100 MHz. The difference between Category 5 and Category 5e is in transmission performance. Category 5e components are most suitable for a high-speed Gigabit Ethernet, while Category 5 components may function to some degree in a Gigabit Ethernet. They perform below standard during high-data transfer scenarios: Channel Performance Characteristics Parameter CAT 5 CAT 5 CAT 5e (ISO Class D) 100 MHz 100 MHz 100 MHz Attenuation 24.0dB 24.0dB 24.0dB NEXT 27.1dB 27.1dB 30.1dB PSNEXT 24.0dB N/A 27.1dB ELFEXT 17.0dB 17.0dB 17.4dB PSELFEXT 14.4dB 14.4dB 14.4dB ACR (derived) 3.1dB 3.1dB 6.1dB PSACR (derived) N/A N/A 3.1dB Return Loss 10.0dB 8.0dB 10.0dB

Q: What are the differences between Category 6 and Category 6e ratings?

A: Both Category 6 and Category 6e consist of unshielded twisted pair with 100 Ohm impedance and electrical characteristics supporting transmissions up to 350 MHz. The difference between Category 6 and Category 6e is in transmission performance. Category 6e components are most suitable for a high-speed Gigabit Ethernet, while Category 6 components may function to some degree in a Gigabit Ethernet. They perform below standard during high-data transfer scenarios:

Q: What are the UL levels of cable?

A: There are three levels. General Purpose: UL 1581; Riser: UL 1666; and Plenum UL These numbers are all fire and safety rated.

Q: What gauge of wire is specified for use with the 6P6C plug?

A: It would be specified for 24-28 AWG Stranded.

Q: We have UTP cables running horizontally with power cable in the same cable tray. In some areas the cables touch. What is the required distance of separation for these cables?

A: Briefly, Article 800.52 (A) (2) of the 2002 NEC code states “Communications wires and cables shall be separated at least 50 mm (2”) from conductors of any electric light, power, Class 1, non-power limited fire alarm, or medium power network-powered broadband communications circuits.” There are two exceptions: 1) the use of specially designed and rated raceway having separate channels where “all the communications circuits are encased…” and 2) where the cables are “separated by a continuous and firmly fixed nonconductor, such as porcelain tubes or flexible tubing, in addition to the insulation on the wire.” In addition to the NEC code, your installation may be subject to state, county, and local codes and ordinance.

Q: What is affected by RoHS?

A RoHS will affect anyone who manufactures in the European Union (EU) and sells electrical and electronic equipment under their own brand. It will also affect resellers in the European Union (EU) who sell products under their own brand or products produced by other suppliers.

Q: I am having difficulty with cable snagging/kinking when pulling?

A :ICC premise cable are manufactured with patented REELEX® winding machine. The REELEX® winding method strives for wire dispersion from the pull box without twists, tangles, snags or overruns. While this is an effective method for facilitating cable pulls, its performance is susceptible to installation handling. To reduce the likelihood of pulling difficulties - Avoid shipping single cartons by courier services where the cartons may be carelessly tossed about, shifting the organized coiling within the box. Also, be careful when transporting the cartons to minimize turbulent movement impact on the inside coils. Once the box is over half-empty, the integrity of the coil is compromised and it is more prone to possible tangles when transported or moved. Avoid re-feeding wires back into the pull box which can disturb the inner coiling. Avoid stacking or pulling from the dispensing box with the dispensing opening face upward.

Q: What is the difference between CAT 6A UTP and FTP?

A :The type of twisted-pair cabling chosen makes a difference in how well a network functions. Electromagnetic and radio waves emitted by electronics or heavy machinery can affect the performance of signals traveling through network. • As a general rule, use FTP cabling in environments with high electromagnetic interference (EMI) or radio frequency interference (RFI) • In electrically quiet environments, opt for UTP cable • UTP cable offers cost savings over FTP cable due to the extra manufacturing process that is required for interference protection in a FTP cable

Q: What is the difference between stranded and solid cable?

A: Stranded cable has several small gauge wires in each separate insulation sleeve. Solid has one large gauge wire in each sleeve. Stranded cable is more flexible, making it more suitable for shorter distances and tight bends such as patch cords. Solid cable has better electrical performance.

Raceway (back to top)

Q: What is the minimum amount of Raceway I can purchase? 

A: The Raceway 20 piece value pack are sold per foot equaling to either 120’ for 6’  raceway sticks or 160’ for 8’ sticks. The individually packed Raceway are sold in cartons of 20 pieces. 

Q: What is the fill capacity of ICC raceway system?

A: ICC raceway system is a 1-piece design that hinges open for easy cable access.  This raceway system is designed to route and protect cabling for low voltage data, voice, fiber and video applications.  Below is the 40% capacity fill chart for ICC raceway system.

Q: Does ICC manufacture clips or some other method of mounting raceways, without using sticky tape?

A: Raceways can be installed with screws on drywall or wood by drilling directly through the raceway without the need for pre-drilling.

Q: How many Category 5 cables can fit into a 0.75 inch raceway, a 1.25 inch raceway, and a 1.75 inch raceway?

A: Category 5 cables may vary in diameter, depending on the manufacturer. Cables will also vary in diameter depending on whether they are plenum or non-plenum. Therefore, trying to identify a specific number is not the best method of determining raceway capacity. According to TIA/EIA-569-A (Section 4.7.3.2), the practical capacity for telecommunications cabling in perimeter raceways ranges from 20% to 40% fill depending on cable-bending radius. The pathway size shall be calculated as follows: the summation of the cross-sectional area of all cables divided by the percent (expressed as a decimal fraction) of fill.

Q: What is a surface raceway, and where is it most commonly used?

A: ICC’s Surface Raceway is an adhesive-backed non-metallic channel used to route, conceal, and, protect network data cabling. A raceway can be designed to meet virtually any configuration by using a variety of channels, covers, reducers, end caps, elbows, tee’s, and ceiling entry channel with clips. The most common use of raceways is to provide an esthetically pleasing way to route cables along walls made of brick or solid masonry (where routing cable inside a wall is not possible). Raceways are also used where cabling moves occur often.

Q: What are the advantages of non-metallic raceways over metallic?

A: Non-metallic raceways are lightweight, durable, easy to cut, resist and conceal dents, chips and scratches, conform to irregular surfaces, are non-conductive, and have the lowest installed cost.

Q: Can non-metallic raceways be painted to match a specific décor?

A: ICC’s Raceway Systems can be easily painted after lightly abrading the surface (or priming the surface), then covering the raceway with a quality Latex-based paint of your choice.

Q: How many cables can fit inside of the raceway conduits?

A: Here is a table with typical fill capacities:

Q: What is affected by RoHS?

A RoHS will affect anyone who manufactures in the European Union (EU) and sells electrical and electronic equipment under their own brand. It will also affect resellers in the European Union (EU) who sell products under their own brand or products produced by other suppliers.

Tool & Connectors (back to top)

Q: What is the meaning or purpose of the “V” mark on ICC HD jacks? 

A: When installer is using ICC Jack EZ tool to terminate HD modular jack, the connector orientations is important for proper termination.  The “V” mark on ICC HD jacks must line up with the “V” mark on Jack EZ tool base. 

Q: Is the ICC JackEasy tool compatible with any other manufacturers modular connectors?

A: No. Now with the unique JackEasy tool terminating all of ICC’s connectors just got easier with the use of a single proprietary tool that crimps and cuts all excess wires with a single squeeze of the handle. The JackEasy is compatible with both EZ and HD modular connectors.

Q: Will a 4P4C plug fit into a 6P6C jack?

A: Yes. It might be a little loose and will damage the outside 2 pins of the 6P6C jack.

Q: Does ICC have a tool which crimps F-type, RCA, BNC, and keystone module type of connectors on coaxial cables?

A Yes. ICACSCT01U Universal Compression Tool provides a quick, easy, and reliable method of terminating and compressing connectors on cables.

Q: Can you recommend a field tester for wiring set ups?

A: The most commonly used testers are Fluke, Ideal, Microtest, and Agilent.

Q: What gauge of wire is specified for use with the 6P6C plug?

A: It would be specified for 24-28 AWG Stranded.

Q: How many Category 5 cables can fit into a 0.75 inch raceway, a 1.25 inch raceway, and a 1.75 inch raceway?

A: Category 5 cables may vary in diameter, depending on the manufacturer. Cables will also vary in diameter depending on whether they are plenum or non-plenum. Therefore, trying to identify a specific number is not the best method of determining raceway capacity. According to TIA/EIA-569-A (Section 4.7.3.2), the practical capacity for telecommunications cabling in perimeter raceways ranges from 20% to 40% fill depending on cable-bending radius. The pathway size shall be calculated as follows: the summation of the cross-sectional area of all cables divided by the percent (expressed as a decimal fraction) of fill.

Q: Does ICC manufacture an RJ-11 plug or jack with 8 conductors?

A: The RJ-11 plug or jack is configured for 6 positions. The RJ-45 plug or jack is configured for 8 positions, 8 conductors modular plug or jack.

Q: Can ICCs 8P8C modular plug be used in the CAT 5 CAT 5e or CAT 6 applications?

A: The 8P8C modular plug is compatible with the CAT 5 or CAT 5e connectors found in mechanical structures. The performance depends on the lowest category of cable patch cord and jacks used. CAT 6 patch cords with modular plugs are precision products just

Q: The punch down tool ICACSPDT00 I’m presently using is too hard to push down, and it doesn’t cut the wires all the way through?

A: ICC has redesigned its punch down tool. The new tool uses 11 kg. for low impact, and 15 kg. for high impact.

Q: Why is it important to use a termination tool?

A: A termination tool must be used to properly seat the wire into the IDC (insulation displacement connector) and insure a good connection. ICC’s ergonomically designed IC110 Punch Down Tool with interchangeable blades and low or high impact settings, was specifically developed to provide quick and efficient connection every time.

Q: Does ICC carry a raceway cutting tool?

A: Yes. ICACSTPE60 Raceway Cutting Tool cuts all ICC’s raceway sections.

Q: Does ICC have a tool which crimps F-type, RCA, BNC, and keystone module type of connectors on coaxial cables?

A: Yes. ICACSCT01U Universal Compression Tool provides a quick, easy, and reliable method of terminating and compressing connectors on cables.

Q: Will ICC compression connectors work on Mini-Coax cable? Or plenum type coax cable?

A: No, the ICC compression connectors were designed to work on standard non-plenum RG-6 or RG-59 cables only.

Q: What is affected by RoHS?

A: RoHS will affect anyone who manufactures in the European Union (EU) and sells electrical and electronic equipment under their own brand. It will also affect resellers in the European Union (EU) who sell products under their own brand or products produced by other suppliers.

Residential Enclosures (back to top)

Q. What accessories does ICC offer for the residential enclosures?

A: ICC offers a variety of accessories for the residential enclosures. Replacement doors and door latches are available for the 14”,21” and 28” residentials enclosures. Rubber grommets can be purchased to keep cables from being cut from sharp edges or to block holes that are not wanted. Brackets to hold routers, hubs/switches, cable modems and other electronic equipment. High quality steal covers to protect residential modules. 4-port and 6-port blank patch panels for versatile modular connections such as voice, data, fiber or video. For additional information, turn to page 78 of the new ICC C18 catalog. 

Q. What are the different types of presentations ICC offers for push-pin RESI modules?

A: ICC offers 3 different types of push-pin presentations for Voice & Data modules for mounting to residential enclosures. The more popular style will be the Compact design along with its bare low-cost PCB board and obvious compact feature. The ICC Premier presentation is protected with a steel bracket construction for high durability and long-lasting use. The third design is the Deluxe, these modules are made of ABS plastic to protect while still offering a light weight design for installers. These 3 presentations of modules are offered for voice, voice expansion, Cat5e and Cat6 modules, as well as some video splitter, combo and multi-media patch panels. ICC push-pin RESI Modules are also compatible with most major manufacturers enclosures.
Compact / No Bracket – ICRESxxxx3C
Deluxe / Plastic Bracket – ICRESxxxx2C
Premier / Steel Bracket – ICRESxxxx1C

Q. Are all ICC Voice, Data & Video Modules compatible with all Residential Enclosures?

A: No ICC offers (2) different types of modules for Voice, Data & Video. The most common type is the push-pin modules, these are compatible with all metal enclosures 14”, 21”, 28” and the plastic 9” enclosure. ICC Push-pin Modules are compatible with most other competitors. The other type of modules is the Mini Modules that snap on only to the Mini Net Media Center and the 8” plastic enclosure. The Video module for the Mini Net Center and 8” enclosures are not removeable and ICC does not offer them to be purchased separately.

Q. Does ICC offer all residential enclosures empty?

A: Not all ICC Residential Enclosures are available empty. All of the ICC plastic residential enclosures are only available in combos which includes the 8”, 9” and mini net media center. ICC does offer metal residential enclosures empty with no modules in 14”, 21”, and 28”. If installer is in need of a smaller, more cost efficient plastic residential enclosure ICC has produce plastic residential enclosures with voice and data modular only (PN: ICRDSMMBW1, ICRDSMMBW8, ICRDSDC9PW, ICRESDC14W) 

Q. Does ICC offer a box to attach to the rectangular knock-outs on residential enclosures?

A: The rectangular knock-outs on ICC enclosures are designed to work with standard single gang electrical box for optional AC power outlet to provide power distribution.  Installers can pick up the standard single gang electrical box from any local hardware stores.

Q. Are ICC CAT 5e and CAT 6 data modules bridged and function similar to an Ethernet network switch or router?

A: ICC CAT 5e and CAT 6 data modules (ICRESDPB1C, ICRESDPB2C, ICRESDPB3C, ICRESDPA1C, ICRESDPA2C and ICRESDPA3C) are non-bridged modules. These modules serve as a patch panel or pass-through for a switch or router to connect computers to a local area network (LAN), such as 10/100 Base-T Ethernet.

Q: What size metal enclosures does ICC have for residential installers/contractors?

A: ICC manufactures four sizes of metal enclosures which are 14”, 21”, 28”, and 42” high and they are all 14.25” wide x 3.65” deep and are made of 18 gage steel. They are designed to fit between building studs but can be wall mounted if needed.

Q: Does ICC makes a plastic Residential Net. Media Enclosure?

A: Yes ICC makes a wall mounted unit that is 9” surface mount or in-wall between studs mountable.

Q: Does ICC make a plastic enclosure that is wall mountable about 7 tall?

A :Yes ICC makes a wall mounted unit that is 7.5” h x 6.5” w x 3.5”d and 9.40” h x 15.10 w x 4.90 d”

Q: What is affected by RoHS?

A: RoHS will affect anyone who manufactures in the European Union (EU) and sells electrical and electronic equipment under their own brand. It will also affect resellers in the European Union (EU) who sell products under their own brand or products produced by other suppliers.

Q: What's the difference between a Splitter and a Diplexer?

A: The main difference between a splitter and a diplexer is the frequencies that they handle. A splitter handles one frequency range between the two ports. Where as a diplexer has a separate frequency range on each port. Splitters main purpose is split the signal that is being fed into it. Splitters can be used as combiners, as long as the frequency stays within the spec of the splitter and will not conflict with the frequency being fed by the other port.

Q: What is the difference between a ICC splitter and other brands?

A Unlike the majority of inexpensive splitters commonly found at various electronics retailers ICC splitters are PCB based. That is, there is a sophisticated printed circuit board in every splitter to provide a very high level of isolation between signals. Better isolation means less chance for interference and distortion such as which is often caused by substandard splitters.

Q: What does a splitter do?

A Splitter takes one RF or television signal and multiplies it to your desired number. ICC makes the highest quality RF splitters available. Please note: each time a coax cable is split the signal strength decreases. Additionally, the larger the splitter the more signal loss you will experience. Signal loss must be accounted for when designing an RF system.

Q :Insertion loss / dB loss when using the splitters

A: The insertion loss is measured in dB. The lower the number, the better are equally balanced and the outputs all have the same insertion loss. This is true of most splitters with two, four, or eight outputs. The average loss is 4.5 dB per split. (A two way splitter has one split, a four-way has 2, an eight way has 3.) Thus an average eight-way splitter should have about 12 to 13.5 dB insertion loss.

Q: What applications do ICC’s Category 5e products support?

A: ICC’s Category 5e products support any application that requires Category 5e, 5, 4, or 3 cabling. This includes, but is not limited to: 10Base-T 100Base-TX 100Base-T4 Token Ring 100VGanyLAN TP-PMD ATM-UTP

Q: Will ICC’s Category 5e system run 155 Mbps ATM?

A: Yes, ICC Category 5e products will handle 155 Mbps ATM.

Q: What is the difference between RG-59 and RG-6 cables, and can they be used on the F-Type Feedthrough Modular Connectors, IC107B5Fxx and IC107B5Gxx?

A: The difference has to do with the center pins, outer diameters, and RF loss. Both utilize 75 Ohm cable found in video applications like cable television. The center conductors are of different gauges; the RG-59 center conductor is 20-22 AWG, and RG-6 is 18 AWG. For RF loss, RG-6 performs better. The outer diameter of RG-6 is larger than RG-59, so a different size F-Type connector is needed on the individual cable ends.

Q: What are the uses for RG-6 and RG-59 cables?

A: RG-6 and RG-59 are two types of coaxial cables, and can be used with F-Type connectors for the distribution of RF signals for cable TV (CATV) and satellite (broadband), or BNC connectors for closed-circuit environments and data transmission (baseband).

Q: What does Network Topology mean?

A: Network Topology is the geometric physical or electrical configuration describing a local communication network; the shape or arrangement of a system. The most common topologies are the bus, ring, and star.

Q: What is the difference between 10BASE-T, 100BASE-T, and 1000BASE-T?

A: 10BASE-T is the IEEE standard that defines the requirement for sending information at 10 Mbps on unshielded twisted-pair cabling, and defines various aspects of running Ethernet on this cabling. 100BASE-T is the IEEE standard that defines the requirement for sending information at 100 Mbps on unshielded twisted-pair cabling, and defines various aspects of running baseband Ethernet on this cabling. 1000BASE-T is the IEEE standard that defines the requirement for sending information at 1000 Mbps on unshielded twisted-pair cabling, and defines various aspects of running baseband Ethernet on this cabling.

Q: What is the wiring configuration for 10BASE-T?

A: Pair 1 = Pin 1(TD+), Pin 2(TD-) Pair 2 = Pin 3(RD+), Pin 6(RD-)

Q: When a second hub was installed in my network, the network no longer functioned. If the second hub is removed, the network functions properly. What are your recommendations for solving the problem?

A: The solution would be to provide a crossover cable between the two hubs. This cable should be configured so that on end is wired to T-568-A and the other end is wired to T-568-B. This configuration will cross receive-to-transmit lines and vise versa, allowing the hubs to talk to each other.

Q: What is network wiring?

A: Network wiring is any transmission path used for information rather than power. Information – in electronic form – can be voice, video, audio, or any form of computer data.

Q: What is the fire-rating or burn test rating for ICC residential enclosures?

A: The UL listing on our enclosures is based on the materials used for its construction. There are other fire ratings for enclosures such as the UL 72 which is for enclosures that store documents and so forth. Our enclosures are not designed for the storage of records our enclosures have not been tested to the UL 72 testing standards for insulated records protection equipment. Under that test the enclosures are assigned a time rating such as “One-Hour Rated Products - 1700°F”. This is mainly for products such as file cabinets, safes and so forth that is intended to help protect items such as paper records, microfilm, computer media, etc. Each has a different degree of tolerance to temperature, humidity and length of time such as during a fire. Our enclosures are designed to hold circuit boards and other connectivity products that do not require that type of protection. All of our enclosures and products within are UL listed meaning they are constructed with UL approved materials and independently tested for basic safety and flammability compliance.

Q: Can I use a coaxial splitter to distribute a satellite signal to two or more receivers?

A: No. A coaxial splitter is for CATV/CCTV use only. A device called a multi-switch is required for distribution of the satellite signal to multiple receivers. The multi-switch contains electronic circuitry that selectively routes the satellite signal from the LNB’s to each receiver. The signal routing is determined by a control voltage (and sometimes a combination of both voltage and tone frequency) that comes from the receiver, based upon channel selection. The multi-switch allows each receiver to view any channel independent of any other receiver. Coaxial splitters are passive devices, and cannot perform this type of selective signal routing.

Q: Why do LAN cables work at 10 Mbps, but not at 100 Mbps?

A: The most common problem is that Category 3 wiring may be somewhere in the system. All horizontal cabling, jack, patch cords, and equipment room cords need to be Category 5e to function properly at the higher transmission rate.

Q: What is Ethernet?

A: Ethernet is the most commonly used network protocol – a network language. With appropriate network software, any computer can understand and use it. This common protocol and its software enable computers and peripherals to communicate with each other, even if they are using different operating systems.

Q: What is the difference between a hub and a switch?

A: A hub is a device where bandwidth is shared among all devices connected to it. A switch; however, is a device where each port has it’s own dedicated bandwidth. Also, the linking maximum for a hub is two units while a switch can accommodate virtually an unlimited number of uplinked units.

Q: What is the benefit of a switch?

A: Since a hub shares all it’s bandwidth among its ports, it is generally slower and more susceptible to collisions and errors. A switch; however, with its own dedicated bandwidth, creates a separate collision domain by dedicating a full 100 Mbps line segment through each port. As well as making a switch faster and more stable, this feature provides virtually unlimited expansion, overcoming the hub uplink limitations in 10Base-T and 100Base-TX networks.

Q: How do you mount ICC’s Net Media Center enclosures (14”, 21” and 28” ) hinged doors?

A: Partially install two(2) hinged door mounting screws in either the two left or right holes on the side of the enclosure. Hang the hinged door on the two partially installed screws using the keyhole openings on the hinge. The door should fit up against the enclosure. Tighten the screws, The hinged door should overlaps ¾” over the installed enclosure to conceal any uneven drywall cuts or openings.

NOTE: Due to the hinged flange attached to either the two left or right holes on the side of the enclosure, the hinged door will surface approximately 0.15” from the drywall.

Q: What standard does ICC’s Mini combos, 8”, 9”, 14”, 21” and 28” (ICRDSMMBxx, ICRDSMMBxx, ICRDSMMBK8, ICRESDC9xx, ICRESDC14x, ICRESDC21x, ICRESDC28x) Net Media Centers compliant with?

A: ICC’s Mini combos, 8”, 9”, 14”, 21” and 28” (ICRDSMMBxx, ICRDSMMBxx, ICRDSMMBK8, ICRESDC9xx, ICRESDC14x, ICRESDC21x, ICRESDC28x) complies to ETL, UL 1863, TIA-568-C, TIA-570-B and TIA-607 standards for communications equipment.

Q: Are ICC’s Net Media Centers outdoor-rated?

A: No. These Net Media Centers (ICRDSMxxxx and ICRESDCxxx) are not weather proof and should not be located outside or where temperature changes and humidity may allow condensation in the enclosure.

Q: Are ICC’s Net Media Centers fire-rated?

A: No. These Net Media Centers (ICRDSMxxxx and ICRESDCxxx) are not fire rated and should not be mounted on fire rated walls. For any limitations on enclosure locations, consult local electrical and building codes before installing enclosures.

ICC – General (back to top)

Q: What is ICC’s primary business?

A: ICC manufactures a wide range of quality and affordable network connectivity and cable management solutions. As an ISO-9001 registered company, ICC offers its customers a tradition of excellence through the company’s extended warranty programs, through BICSI accredited training courses, and by providing the finest technical support and customer care.

Q: What kind of products does ICC manufacture?

A: ICC’s major product line includes a wide range of multi-port and cross connect solutions, cable management and patch cord solutions, fiber optics, small-office and home office solutions, voice connectivity, raceway system solutions, and tools and accessories.

Q: Where can ICC products be purchased?

A: ICC products are available through the company’s vast network of Distributors worldwide.

Q: What is structured cabling?

A: Structured cabling is a cabling system that complies with the TIA-568A Telecommunications Cabling Standard. The standard specified a “generic” cabling system – that is, a one-size-fits-all approach that supports a multi-product, multi-use, multi-vendor environment independent of applications. The standard also established cabling performance requirements. Governing agencies/ associations:

  • TIA Telecommunications Industry Association
  • EIA Electronics Industries Association
  • IEEE The Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers
  • ISO International Organization for Standards
  • ANSI American National Standards Institute
  • NEC National Electrical Code
  • FCC Federal Communication Commission
  • NEMA National Electrical Manufacturers Association
  • UL Underwriter’s Laboratories
  • ETL Intertek

Warranty (back to top)

Q: What are the ICCs Warranties and what do they cover?

A: 3-Year Limited Product Warranty
ICC warrants its products to be free from defects in material and workmanship for 3 years from the date of original purchase.

15-Year Performance Limited Warranty
Guaranteed system performance from end-to-end for 15 years from the date of installation for Elite Installers. Coverage includes the replacement of ICC products only. You don’t have to be certified and no training is needed. This 15-year performance warranty covers end-to-end projects using ICC category-rated connectivity products and premise cables.   This 15-year Performance Limited Warranty does not cover fiber optic product installation.

Lifetime Performance Limited Warranty
Guaranteed system performance from end-to-end for the usable life of the cabling system. Coverage includes replacement of ICC products and labor to replace them. This structured cabling system must be installed by a Certified Elite Installer with ICC category-rated connectivity products plus ICC horizontal premise cable as an end-to-end PermanentLink solution.  Submit Lifetime Verified Site Form prior to the installation.  The site must be verified as an ICC Verified Site Cabling System.  This Lifetime Performance Limited Warranty does not cover fiber optic product installation.

Q: What happens to lifetime warranty if Certified Elite Installer (CEI) is no longer in business?

A: ICC Lifetime Warranty (LW) is a joint warranty between ICC and CEI offered to the End User (EU). It is not a sole warranty from ICC to EU. ICC only provides hardware and does not sell the installation to EU, it is CEI who installs and sells the installation with labor. The lifetime warranty will become invalid when CEI is no longer doing business, However, ICC will go above and beyond to help the end user: EU can find another CEI to recertify the site and transfer the joint warranty to the new CEI. If there is an issue requiring repair, ICC will find a CEI to fix it and end user pay only a small labor cost.

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